Topic: Housing and Land

Event
Event Date: 11/05/2020 (All day)

The annual NASCO Institute is always a one-of-a-kind opportunity to network with hundreds of cooperative leaders and employers, to caucus about pressing issues, and to work on building an inclusive and accessible cooperative movement.

Resource
Published July 2020

New report from MIT CoLab on transformative strategies from movement-oriented CLTs and permanent real estate cooperatives

Event
Event Date: 07/09/2020 - 2:00pm

Schumacher Center In celebration of 40 years of the Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures,Schumacher Center are highlighting the work of past speakers and asking for updates of their earlier remarks in light of recent events.

Resource
Published April 2020

“Owning the Future” coauthors Jonty Leibowitz and Neil McInroy outline a COVID-19 economic recovery plan capable of ushering in a new era of community wealth building in the United Kingdom.

Event
Event Date: 05/13/2020 - 4:00pm

Join this informative workshop for anyone looking to land their intentional community.

Event
Event Date: 04/16/2021 (All day)

BREAKING NEWS: #PowerShift2021 will take place in New Orleans, LA from April 16-18, 2021!

Event
Event Date: 02/22/2020 (All day)

Coho US’s first ever online conference will be on a topic that is at the forefront of conversations about how to expand cohousing in the United States.

Event
Event Date: 11/06/2019 - 6:00pm

A special event hosted by Shareable and SPUR November 6, 6-9pm with a keynote presentation and panel discussion featuring Richard Rothstein, author of the acclaimed book, “The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America”; Noni Session, Executive Director of East Bay Permanent Real Estate Cooperative; Chris Iglesias, Executive Director of Unity Council; Sarah Jo Szambelan, leader of SPUR’s place types research; and Neal Gorenflo, Executive Director of Shareable.

Resource
Published January 2019

When natural disasters strike, weather systems and unjust economic systems compound to cause devastation for people of color, in particular, while generating economic opportunity for the wealthy few.

Resource
Published March 2019

The deep and persistent racial wealth divide will not close without bold, structural reform. It has been created and held in place by public policies that have evolved with time including slavery, Jim Crow, red lining, mass incarceration, among many others. The racial wealth divide is greater today than it was nearly four decades ago and trends point to its continued widening.

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